5 Ways to Protect Plants from Thunderstorms and Heavy Rain

Fortunately, smaller plants are easier to protect, so long as you take quick action to avoid storm damage to your garden or landscaping.

Fortunately, smaller plants are easier to protect, so long as you take quick action to avoid storm damage to your garden or landscaping.

While the well-being of your trees and shrubs may not be of much concern during storms or other intense weather events, such as the recent Hurricane Florence, smaller plants can be easily damaged or even wiped out during inclement weather. Fortunately, smaller plants are easier to protect, so long as you take quick action to avoid storm damage to your garden or landscaping. Following are five ways to protect your native plants from thunderstorms and heavy rain.

Protect the Roots

A simple preventative measure is to protect the roots of your plants from weather damage by spreading mulch. A 3-inch layer around the root area will protect the plant from cold damage following heavy rain. Just keep the mulch at least 3 inches from the plant’s foliage.

Coverage

Cover your plants with overturned pots, bowls, buckets, or other appropriately-sized containers to keep them from suffering wind and rain damage. Be sure to weigh down the coverings in order to hold them in place–rocks, cement blocks, and bricks will work just fine.

Wrapping

Wrapping certain plants in a strong fabric, such as burlap, will protect them from the elements. For larger plants, vines, and shrubs, wrap the plant in burlap and tie with heavy twine, using garden stakes to make a frame where necessary. For newly planted trees, at least the trunks should be wrapped in a similar manner, though the frame should be made from posts about a foot taller than the tree to ensure protection from heavy winds.  Wrapping the entire tree will protect it from cold weather.

Row Covers

Using a heavy row cover, or frost blanket, will help protect rows and beds of smaller plants from storm damage. With this method, it is important to leave extra room on either side of the row cover and weigh it down tightly before a major storm.

Anchors

Trees and shrubs that have been newly planted stand to take a lot of damage during a driving storm. These plants should be anchored using 2 to 3-foot stakes pounded about 20 inches into the ground. Stakes should be angled away from the plant before twine is tied to the plant and attached to the stakes.

Visit Native American Plants

Whether you’re looking to restore a local wetland or beautify your property, American Native Plants can provide you with the right plants for the job. With an inventory of over 400,000 native trees, native shrubs, and herbaceous plants consider American Native Plants your one-stop shop for wholesale native plant needs. Peruse our catalog, give us a call, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+!

This entry was posted on Friday, September 14th, 2018 at 8:43 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.